NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC’S “KILLER SHOTS” AIRS TONIGHT

 

This new show from National Geographic follows host and cameraman Andy as he travels the globe searching for “killer shots” of wild animals. It’s a behind-the-scenes look into what it takes to get the dramatic shots that we’ve come to associate National Geographic with. This episode follows Andy to False Bay, South Africa, where he works to get shots of predation events between great white sharks and seals. I served as the DP for this episode’s topside photography. Andy got all the underwater shots, some of which came while free- diving with the sharks. He assures that it’s safe (mostly) as long as you don’t look like seal meat.

“TRENCHES” WINS TELLY AWARD FOR CINEMATOGRAPHY!

trenchesTrenches”, an original on-line science-fiction series, recently garnered a Telly Award for cinematography. I served as one of two camera operators on the series. Big congrats go to DP Jack Foley, as well as gaffer Donnie Aros.

 

They turned a rock quarry in Virginia into a believable and very cool-looking futuristic battlefield on a worn-torn planet. I had a lot of fun running through the trenches following the soldiers as I got bathed in blasts of dirt and rock.

 

Big ups to the rest of the camera crew, including Sean Simmons
(camera op), Nick Kovacic (ac), and Chris Wiezorek (ac).

“WAITING FOR SUPERMAN” IS WAITING FOR YOU!

Waiting for Superman“Waiting for Superman”, the latest documentary from the team that brought us “It Might Get Loud” and “An Inconvenient Truth” is now available on DVD.

 

I was fortunate to work as a camera operator for a few scenes in the film. The film looks gorgeous, thanks to director of photography Erich Roland, who also shot “It Might Get Loud”. Oh, and the story is fantastic, too.

 

Director David Guggenheim, whose films are some of the most critically-acclaimed documentaries in recent years, tackles perhaps his most challenging subject yet – the nation’s failing education system. It’s a riviting and eye-opening tale of the disaster that is our education system.

Critic Jim Schembri may may have put it best when he wrote,“It’s possible that one of the reasons why the film wasn’t nominated for a best-documentary Oscar was because it was too horrifying.”

Critic Jim Schembri may may have put it best when he wrote,“It’s possible that one of the reasons why the film wasn’t nominated for a best-documentary Oscar was because it was too horrifying.” See for yourself.