RED EPIC IN ACTION

By Doug Gritzmacher

Denver Director of Photography & Cinematographer

Doug Gritzmacher

I had my first chance to operate RED’s newest beast recently on a studio shoot. Let me say that it is actually very unbeastly, at least compared to it’s predecessor, the RED ONE. It sizes in at about, I’m guessing here, 40 percent of the RED ONE’s size. Of course, that is good and bad: good, because we always like smaller; bad, because now all the attachments (viewfinder, LCD, cables, etc) have to live much closer together, which makes building the camera that much more of a hassle. But hey, you can not argue with the image quality relative to the footprint and I’m a big fan especially of the touch screen LCD for all the menu controls.

“THE MAN NOBODY KNEW” IN THEATERS

By Doug Gritzmacher

Denver Director of Photography & Cinematographer

The Man Nobody Knew In search of my fat her cia spymaster william colbyWilliam Colby, perhaps the nation’s most legendary CIA spymaster, helped sway elections against the Communists in Italy, oversaw the coup against President Diem in Saigon, and ran the controversial Phoenix Program in Vietnam. He later unveiled before Congress many of these dark secrets of the CIA, except one — himself.

 

Colby was a mysterious figure even in his own household. In an attempt to uncloak his father, Colby’s son Carl interviews a legion of high-power Washington insiders—from journalists to former cabinet members to former national security advisors—who knew and worked with his father.

 

I had the pleasure of sitting in on all of these interviews in my role as a camera operator and camera assistant during the production of this film. The interviews are gorgeously lit by NY-based cinematographer Gary Steele. He used (and I hope I’m not giving away a secret of his own here) two 2k fresnels bounced off a large white card through a large white sheet of muslin, which had the effect of producing an extremely soft and intriguing wrap of light around the subjects. See the film and you’ll see what I mean.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC’S “KILLER SHOTS” AIRS TONIGHT

By Doug Gritzmacher

Denver Director of Photography & Cinematographer

 

This new show from National Geographic follows host and cameraman Andy as he travels the globe searching for “killer shots” of wild animals. It’s a behind-the-scenes look into what it takes to get the dramatic shots that we’ve come to associate National Geographic with. This episode follows Andy to False Bay, South Africa, where he works to get shots of predation events between great white sharks and seals. I served as the DP for this episode’s topside photography. Andy got all the underwater shots, some of which came while free- diving with the sharks. He assures that it’s safe (mostly) as long as you don’t look like seal meat.

“TRENCHES” WINS TELLY AWARD FOR CINEMATOGRAPHY!

By Doug Gritzmacher

Denver Director of Photography & Cinematographer

trenchesTrenches”, an original on-line science-fiction series, recently garnered a Telly Award for cinematography. I served as one of two camera operators on the series. Big congrats go to DP Jack Foley, as well as gaffer Donnie Aros.

 

They turned a rock quarry in Virginia into a believable and very cool-looking futuristic battlefield on a worn-torn planet. I had a lot of fun running through the trenches following the soldiers as I got bathed in blasts of dirt and rock.

 

Big ups to the rest of the camera crew, including Sean Simmons
(camera op), Nick Kovacic (ac), and Chris Wiezorek (ac).

“WAITING FOR SUPERMAN” IS WAITING FOR YOU!

By Doug Gritzmacher

Denver Director of Photography & Cinematographer

Waiting for Superman“Waiting for Superman”, the latest documentary from the team that brought us “It Might Get Loud” and “An Inconvenient Truth” is now available on DVD.

 

I was fortunate to work as a camera operator for a few scenes in the film. The film looks gorgeous, thanks to director of photography Erich Roland, who also shot “It Might Get Loud”. Oh, and the story is fantastic, too.

 

Director David Guggenheim, whose films are some of the most critically-acclaimed documentaries in recent years, tackles perhaps his most challenging subject yet – the nation’s failing education system. It’s a riviting and eye-opening tale of the disaster that is our education system.

Critic Jim Schembri may may have put it best when he wrote,“It’s possible that one of the reasons why the film wasn’t nominated for a best-documentary Oscar was because it was too horrifying.”

Critic Jim Schembri may may have put it best when he wrote,“It’s possible that one of the reasons why the film wasn’t nominated for a best-documentary Oscar was because it was too horrifying.” See for yourself.